What to do with a bachelors degree in creative writing

See Methodology Get Ranking Seal Professional writers are the minds behind the content we read every day. Some specialize in creative compositions, such as novels, short stories, theatrical scripts, screenplays and songs. Alternatively, technical writers produce how-to-guides, product manuals, brochures and other materials used by consumers. Other writing majors find their calling in the field of journalism, crafting articles and editorials for newspapers, magazines and academic journals.

What to do with a bachelors degree in creative writing

What are good careers for creative writing majors? And that person can be you! I myself earned my degree in Creative Writing, and make an upper middle class living writing professionally. I write all day long, in addition to doing a lot of what you might more broadly call communications work strategic messaging, institutional marketing, speech writing, etc.

And similarly, I work with a lot of writers in varying degrees of employ, from professionals to freelancers and everything in between.

Best Colleges with Creative Writing Degrees

And I think it sometimes surprises Creative Writing majors to know that their skills and degrees can be put to good and lucrative use in ways that don't involve either: There is no need to box yourself into that paradigm if you don't want to and are open minded about ways to support yourself with your talents and experience as a writer.

You'll notice I'm going well beyond just "creative writing" here because that's a fairly reductionist label that isn't really used outside of the college major paradigm.

Really what I'm talking about are people who are skilled writers and storytellers. So just a few big buckets worth mentioning: I am using the slash because I think most people, when they hear "journalism," think "newspaper reporter" or some variation of that.

But in truth, think of all the many many platforms you encounter on a daily basis - from websites to newsletters to institutional publications to content aggregators to whatever - and for every one of them there is a huge need for content to feed the beast.

I wound up starting, in all places, by picking up work at my university's alumni magazine, and from there expanded out to other institutions and organizations who did their own institutional publications, dabbled in some media publications or like free City View papers, and it was great fun and once you're plugged in a little, can be pretty lucrative.

But there is a constant need in the world for good freelance writers or stringers who you can say "hey, this guy at our organization just made a great breakthrough in such such field and we'd like to write a story about it and feature it in our channels" and who know how to do it and do good work.

And, like journalism, it typically involves interviewing, doing research, crafting a compelling narrative, etc.

Sometimes it's bylined sometimes it's not, sometimes it's freelance or sometimes it's agency-related or sometimes it's an actual staff position somewhere, but if all you wanted to do in life was to be handed subjects and go off and write compelling articles about them, you certainly can do that in thousands of ways in basically every field and subject area.

I do a lot of institutional marketing myself, and I am constantly working with writers, illustrators, graphic designers, multimedia specialists, photographers, videographers, boutique programmers, etc.

They come from the professional world but they also come from art schools from random passion backgrounds from writing programs from all kinds of places. And, while it's institutional in nature and marketing in form, it can still be fun, creative, and rewarding stuff.

Sometimes this is an in-house capability for a particular product or company, sometimes it's in an agency that does that work on contract basis, sometimes it's freelance or for-hire work, but there's a lot of it, and many people who make great careers doing it.

Typically, just straight writing - as in being a writer, that's what you do all day - maxes out at some point as a career path.

Above it on the totem poll will be the people who manage communications for institutions and organizations.

Master the Art of Captivating Storytelling with an Online Creative Writing Degree

Name any company, nonprofit, associations, whatever, and chances are if they have more than 20 people, they have a staff member devoted to helping managing the communications needs.

It could be a single individual, or it could be a person shop, but being a communications manager or executive is a career path unto itself. It involves some writing, or it involves managing writing projects, and it also entails thinking strategically about how to position an organization or what kind of stories to tell about it or how to articulate its vision.

This is basically the sort of work that I do for a living, and it is wildly varied, challenging, and exciting. You have to think of great stories but also ways of talking about things so that people hear you through the noise, or ways of differentiating your organization or product from everybody else's.Creative writing is both bad and good in that it in no way operates on an apprenticeship sort of model, or where you get such and such degree that leads to such and such graduate degree that leads to the standard "ground floor" position that you work your way up from (in the way that law, or business, or medicine might).

I have an undergraduate degree in English and Creative Writing.

What to do with a bachelors degree in creative writing

After college I landed in marketing and PR and spent more than a decade in that field. Like you, I think I .

What to do with a bachelors degree in creative writing

Graduate degrees are offered in specialized areas as well, such as Creative Writing, Journalism, and Science Writing. Jobs in writing can work alongside the publishing industry, such as writing for a magazine, or can be supplemented by jobs in education, such as teaching Technical Writing.

Writing degrees span a variety of concentrations, including professional writing, business writing, technical writing, creative writing and science writing.

What Can You Do With a Creative Writing Degree? | HuffPost

By specializing in these fields during their degree programs, students can develop marketable skills and pursue numerous career paths after graduation.

Authors who take up the craft of creative writing are the ones to thank for the captivating fantasy stories found in movies, television, and, of course, books.

1. Creative Writing Professor * — For some, the most satisfying thing isn’t to do, but to empower and teach the next generation. An online degree in creative writing paves the way for a variety of career paths ranging from screenwriting to technical editing.

Whether you have aspirations of becoming a novelist or magazine publisher, you can customize your degree to fit your professional goals and interests.

Writing Major | What Can You Do with a Creative Writing Degree